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February 2017 Archives

More on the Snapchat distracted driving case and the issues of causation, foreseeability

Previously, we briefly mentioned a distracted driving case in which the developer of the app Snapchat was held to be immune from liability for a user’s distracted driving accident. Immunity was granted based on a federal law protecting providers and users of interactive computer services from liability for statements made by other content providers.

Looking a bit more at that Snapchat distracted driving case

Previously, we began discussing a recent case in which a court dismissed a claim against the developer of the app Snapchat for its alleged role in an accident caused by a teen driver using the app’s “speed filter” feature. The teen driver, according to sources, had been using that feature while travelling at a high rate of speed.

What if a police officer should take action and doesn't?

Law enforcement throughout the country has been front-and-center in the public conversation for the last couple of years. It is not a simple conversation, but the fact of the matter is that some people do experience discrimination at the hands of law enforcement.

Couple loses bid to sue Snapchat over unsafe app feature involved in 2015 crash

Distracted driving is, as readers know, a significant problem in the United States, particularly distracted driving caused by cell phone use. Despite the passage of state laws specifically penalizing distracted driving, public education campaigns on the dangers of distracted driving, and increased enforcement efforts, the habit of distracted driving has proven to be a stubborn one.

What rights do employees have under the National Labor Relations Act?

Previously, we looked at a recent memorandum written by the general counsel of the National Labor Relations Board which opined that some college athletes may be considered employees having rights under the National Labor Relations Act. This federal law recognizes the right of employees to organize in order to seek improved working conditions and wages, and to forms unions to negotiate such matters with employers.

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